Week 8 Discussion: Political Compass Results Required re

Week 8 Discussion: Political Compass Results

Required resources:
Read/review the following resources for this activity:

Lesson
Political Compass Test Results
Additional scholarly sources you identify through your own research
Link (webpage): Discussion Guidelines

Please follow the guidelines to get full credit.

Textbook:

Magstadt, T. (2017). Understanding politics: Ideas, institutions, and issues (12th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage.

Initial Post Instructions
Go to the site: https://www.politicalcompass.org. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
Scroll to the end of the site where it says “take the test”.
Answer all of the questions.
After you answer the questions, there will be a chart with your Economic and Social numbers.

After taking the political compass test, tell the class what your scores are and what they mean. Then, analyze why you believe the results or do not believe the scores. Finally, discuss how this course has been beneficial to your daily life and career choice. Use evidence (cite sources) to support your response from assigned readings or online lessons, and at least TWO outside scholarly sources.

Class, take the Political Compass Test at www.politicalcompass.org (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Go to the Take the Test tab. Then answer the questions asked of you. Be sure to print or save your results!

Then tell the class what your scores are and what they mean. Then, analyze why you believe the results or do not believe the scores.

Lesson:The Political Compass

Introduction:
This is it. You made it through political science! During this week, we will take the political compass test.

Understanding specific terms regarding the political spectrum is the key to unlocking its mysteries. This week, you will be taking the Political Compass Test. This is done to help you pinpoint your exact political stance on social and economic matters and to see how the government impacts your daily interactions. To fully grasp your results, let’s begin by exploring the graph structure and the terms presented in this assignment.

The Graph Structure
The horizontal perspective

This line represents your views regarding how much control the government should

have over the economy.

The further right your dot moves, the more you support no regulation or control by the

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The further left your dot moves, the more you support complete regulation or control

by the government.

The vertical perspective

This line represents your views regarding how much control the government should

have on social matters or items concerning your daily life.

The further up the scale your dot moves, the more you support governmental regulation

of daily life, such as the creation of laws to maintain order, or to support certain fundamental beliefs.

The further down the scale your dot moves, the more you support individual regulation,

rather than government control, of daily life.

The Terms

==

The four terms provided on the graph represent the extremes people may support

The right: All the way to the right presents the concept of 100% capitalism.

This means no governmental regulation of business of any kind.

This means a completely market-regulated economy.

The left: All the way to the left presents the concept of 100% socialism.

This means complete governmental regulation of business.

Production is completely owned and operated by government.

Authoritarian: All the way to the top presents the concept of an authoritarian government.

This means complete government control over your daily life.

For example, the government declares there is no religion within the country, or there is a national religion that all must follow. Or it tells you what you can or cannot know, as in controlling the media or the Internet.

Libertarian: All the way to the bottom presents the concept of individual freedom to regulate your own actions.

This means that regulations regarding what you can or cannot do are in your hands, or at least local government hands, rather than at the national level.

For example, all individuals can possess guns, without any regulations such as gun safety classes, registration of firearms, or wait limits.

Usually, people do not fall on the far points of the graph, but somewhere in between the extremes. Again, your results will vary depending how much power you think the government should have in regulating business and your daily interactions.

Summary
Image of bubbles with words Right, Government, Democracy, Power, Politics, Capitalism, Fascism, Anarchy, Socialism, Liberal

We ended this course taking the political compass test that explained where you fall on the political spectrum. Although this course wasn’t all inclusive of all political science ideas, it gives you a good understanding of political science. Throughout this course, we discussed the importance of studying political science in our lives, the various branches and powers of the US democracy, how other countries have developed their democracies, who is an ideal citizen, living in a totalitarian nation, and domestic and foreign affairs.

While servant leadership is often associated with Christian

While servant leadership is often associated with Christianity and the Bible, one could argue it is compatible with most religions and philosophies and that it transcends cultures. This assignment presents you with an opportunity to explore other cultures, philosophies, and religions and asks you to think critically about how servant leadership practices are apparent in other religious and cultural values.

Select one cultural context and one religious viewpoint (other than Christianity, its denominations, or something already discussed in the textbook) and examine how the principles of servant leadership are evident in that culture and religion. In a 1,250-1,500-word essay, identify similarities and differences between servant leadership’s philosophies and the values evident in the selected cultural context and religious viewpoint. Be sure to provide specific examples of practices and/or values in your discussion.

You are required to locate two articles that examine servant leadership from a different cultural perspective and two articles that examine servant leadership from a different religious perspective. Be sure to select academic articles from reputable sources that are 10-20 pages in length. Include information from the articles in your discussion.

Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

Refer to the rubric attached titled, “Topic 3: Servant Leadership in Diverse Contexts,” prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin.

Reflect on interest groups and democracy. Discuss whether i

Reflect on interest groups and democracy. Discuss whether interest groups magnify the power of individuals to influence government and public policy or if they are used as a tool to exclude “regular people” in favor of wealthy elites. Also discuss whether changing the present election system so that it runs on limited public financing, via tax dollars, instead of contributions from interest groups and wealthy donors, would make the system more democratic and open.

In responding to your classmates, discuss if such a policy violates the free speech rights of interest groups and their members.

For your response posts (2), you must do the following:

 Reply to at least two different classmates outside of your own initial post thread.

 In Module One, complete the two response posts by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time.

 In Modules Two through Eight, complete the two response posts by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. of your local time zone.

 Demonstrate more depth and thought than simply stating that “I agree” or “You are wrong.” Guidance is provided for you in each discussion prompt.
classmates Post #1:

Interest Groups can be considered the Fans, of the two major parties in politics. When looking for a team to root for. Here enters the Interest groups working from the bottom-up helping to educate voters, raise money, and increase awareness. In fact, the political parties of countries with multiparty systems look a lot like the interest groups of the United States. These groups make large donations of time, and resources to the parties. They try to influence the direction and decision making of parties. They try to recruit the best players to run as candidates under party banners. Nonetheless, they are not the parties, and they must rely on parties and candidates to win the game. (Evans & Michaud, 2019) I believe that there are groups of (regular) people that are not always spoken for, yet there are Interest groups focused on some of those groups like the N.A.A.C.P.

I don’t think changing the Election system to public financing will make it more democratic. Interest groups have been particularly useful to campaigns through their financial sponsorship of political advertising. On television, radio, and the internet, interest groups broadcast the virtues of some candidates and lambast the faults of others. (Evans & Michaud, 2019) I believe we need that funding to learn about all the candidates and what they stand for. I am one of those people that does not follow politics, and every person running in every election. I will not lie, some of those ads have helped me with past voting decisions.

Resources:

Evans, J., & Michaud, K. (2019). Central ideas in American government (9th ed.). Asheville, NC: Soomo Learning. Available from http://www.webtexts.com

classmates Post #2:

I am going to admit that before reading chapter 13 in Central Ideas In American Government I had a different idea in my mind of what interest groups were about. I believed that they were the “bad guy” and a useless part of politics and I am one who does her research but I never went in depth in trying to learn what interest groups are and what their objective in politics consists of. Well I have been enlightened. An interest group is a group of individuals that share a common interest that seek to influence government and public policy. They “provide political representation to members of society who share similar interests” (Evans & Michaud, 2019). They attempt this by direct influence through lobbying or indirect influence over policy through election activities. A misconception that I had about interest groups, and one that many others do as well, was that they attempt to buy the votes of members of Congress through campaign contributions when in fact they only focus on candidates that already support their cause, so they are not buying off someone that was not on their side to begin with. Essentially what an interest groups contributions are buying is access to politicians so that their causes can be heard one on one. An example of that would be the NRA, an interest group, contributing to the campaign of a Republican who is a staunch supporter of gun right. Interest groups are there to provide meaningful information to politicians on behalf of their constituents.

I do believe interest groups exclude “regular people,” but only to an extent. There are many interest groups that represent people in the lower socioeconomic sector. There is the United Farm Workers of America that represents the men and women who pick crops, Planned parenthood represents individuals with low income and no insurance, the Children Defense Fund and so on. It’s true that the majority of lobbyists are hired by private interest because they have the resources, especially monetary, and that can be a disadvantage for the public interest groups who may not have the same resources. Yet there is still representation and there are members in Congress that look out for the interest of their lower socioeconomic constituents. Interest groups do play a big role in our democracy when it comes to policy change and they will continue to do so as long as the government doesn’t put any restrictions on their contributions and lobbying. Using tax dollars to finance an election instead of interest group contributions can be seen as a more democratic move but I would personally not want my tax money going to a candidate that I oppose.

Evans, J., & Michaud, K. (2019). Central ideas in American government (9th ed.). Asheville, NC.

Soomo: Learning. Retrieved from http://www.webtexts.com

Reflect on interest groups and democracy. Discuss whether i

Reflect on interest groups and democracy. Discuss whether interest groups magnify the power of individuals to influence government and public policy or if they are used as a tool to exclude “regular people” in favor of wealthy elites. Also discuss whether changing the present election system so that it runs on limited public financing, via tax dollars, instead of contributions from interest groups and wealthy donors, would make the system more democratic and open.

In responding to your classmates, discuss if such a policy violates the free speech rights of interest groups and their members.

For your response posts (2), you must do the following:

 Reply to at least two different classmates outside of your own initial post thread.

 In Module One, complete the two response posts by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time.

 In Modules Two through Eight, complete the two response posts by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. of your local time zone.

 Demonstrate more depth and thought than simply stating that “I agree” or “You are wrong.” Guidance is provided for you in each discussion prompt.
classmates Post #1:

Interest Groups can be considered the Fans, of the two major parties in politics. When looking for a team to root for. Here enters the Interest groups working from the bottom-up helping to educate voters, raise money, and increase awareness. In fact, the political parties of countries with multiparty systems look a lot like the interest groups of the United States. These groups make large donations of time, and resources to the parties. They try to influence the direction and decision making of parties. They try to recruit the best players to run as candidates under party banners. Nonetheless, they are not the parties, and they must rely on parties and candidates to win the game. (Evans & Michaud, 2019) I believe that there are groups of (regular) people that are not always spoken for, yet there are Interest groups focused on some of those groups like the N.A.A.C.P.

I don’t think changing the Election system to public financing will make it more democratic. Interest groups have been particularly useful to campaigns through their financial sponsorship of political advertising. On television, radio, and the internet, interest groups broadcast the virtues of some candidates and lambast the faults of others. (Evans & Michaud, 2019) I believe we need that funding to learn about all the candidates and what they stand for. I am one of those people that does not follow politics, and every person running in every election. I will not lie, some of those ads have helped me with past voting decisions.

Resources:

Evans, J., & Michaud, K. (2019). Central ideas in American government (9th ed.). Asheville, NC: Soomo Learning. Available from http://www.webtexts.com

classmates Post #2:

I am going to admit that before reading chapter 13 in Central Ideas In American Government I had a different idea in my mind of what interest groups were about. I believed that they were the “bad guy” and a useless part of politics and I am one who does her research but I never went in depth in trying to learn what interest groups are and what their objective in politics consists of. Well I have been enlightened. An interest group is a group of individuals that share a common interest that seek to influence government and public policy. They “provide political representation to members of society who share similar interests” (Evans & Michaud, 2019). They attempt this by direct influence through lobbying or indirect influence over policy through election activities. A misconception that I had about interest groups, and one that many others do as well, was that they attempt to buy the votes of members of Congress through campaign contributions when in fact they only focus on candidates that already support their cause, so they are not buying off someone that was not on their side to begin with. Essentially what an interest groups contributions are buying is access to politicians so that their causes can be heard one on one. An example of that would be the NRA, an interest group, contributing to the campaign of a Republican who is a staunch supporter of gun right. Interest groups are there to provide meaningful information to politicians on behalf of their constituents.

I do believe interest groups exclude “regular people,” but only to an extent. There are many interest groups that represent people in the lower socioeconomic sector. There is the United Farm Workers of America that represents the men and women who pick crops, Planned parenthood represents individuals with low income and no insurance, the Children Defense Fund and so on. It’s true that the majority of lobbyists are hired by private interest because they have the resources, especially monetary, and that can be a disadvantage for the public interest groups who may not have the same resources. Yet there is still representation and there are members in Congress that look out for the interest of their lower socioeconomic constituents. Interest groups do play a big role in our democracy when it comes to policy change and they will continue to do so as long as the government doesn’t put any restrictions on their contributions and lobbying. Using tax dollars to finance an election instead of interest group contributions can be seen as a more democratic move but I would personally not want my tax money going to a candidate that I oppose.

Evans, J., & Michaud, K. (2019). Central ideas in American government (9th ed.). Asheville, NC.

Soomo: Learning. Retrieved from http://www.webtexts.com

Please watch the video, “Andrew Jackson: Good, Evil, and th

Please watch the video, “Andrew Jackson: Good, Evil, and the Presidency” athttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kJmw3nzuB4, review the text (if necessary), and respond to the questions below.

After completing the questions, you will be posting your responses as your initial discussion post. This initial post is due no later than Friday at 11:59pm. Students may NOT edit initial posts once posted. Discussion scores will be based on the original post.

Your initial post should be a minimum of 8 lines in length and be written in sentences (rather than just listing the letter, or a short phrase).

Before Sunday 11:59pm, please respond to two other classmates’ initial posts (not follow-up posts) for Question #5, Part 2, with meaningful responses that address the substance of their post. Each of these follow-up posts should be a minimum of 4 lines in length.

Question 1

According to Jackson’s biographer James Partin, which of the following is NOT among the contradictions exhibited by his subject?

Democratic autocrat
Urbane savage
Atrocious saint
Populist technocrat
Question 2

In the eyes of the historians interviewed, which of the following is NOT one of Jackson’s key accomplishments?

He was loved by the American people
He enlarged the possibilities of American democracy
He advanced a more far-reaching role for the federal government
He broadened the reach of the presidency as an institution
Question 3

Which of the following is NOT a reason Jackson remains controversial?

His policies encroached on the rights and lands of Native Americans
He advocated more democracy in the realm of voting rights
He was moody and hot-tempered
He was a slave owner
Question 4

According to the video, Jackson was viewed during his lifetime as the most popular living president, the “idol of the American people.” Why is this? What factors contribute to the popularity of an American president?

Question 5

The history principle holds that “past events shape current viewpoints and perspectives.” Describe how this is evident in the presidency of Andrew Jackson, both among his contemporaries and in more recent years.

Part 2. Discuss how our view of the presidency as an institution has evolved over time. Is this evolution positive or negative? Why?

1. Developing a clear and concise thesis statement (an arg

1. Developing a clear and concise thesis statement (an argument) in response to the following question: Does the film have the power to transform political sensibilities?

2. Writing an outline for a five paragraph analytical essay building on a clear and concise thesis statement, including topic sentences and secondary supports

3. Identifying and explaining three scenes from the film text in support of the thesis statement/argument.

4. Writing an introductory paragraph for the outlined analytical essay

Instructions Your country just overthrew its dictator, and

Instructions
Your country just overthrew its dictator, and you are the newly elected President. Unfortunately, due to the divisions in the country and the years of war, economic, military, and political structures are non-existent. A group of loyalists to the old dictator have been detonating bombs, murdering civilians, assassinating leaders, and terrorizing towns with help from a neighboring country’s dictator.

Create a comprehensive plan for your new government. While creating this government identify 1) the governing style of your government and the principles that govern your leaders (see rubric); 2) the functions of various branches of government; 3) how to maintain public good in domestic areas through at least two programs; 4) an economic structure that is most beneficial to your citizens; 5) ways to create national unity; 6) ways to combat terrorism and violence; and, 6) international organizations to join.

See rubric for specific ways to meet the requirements of the paper.

Paper headings: (Use of APA paper format with headings required!)

Reference: Magstadt, T. M. (2017). Understanding politics: Ideas, institutions, and issues. Australia: Cengage Learning.

Writing Requirements (APA format)

Length: 3-4 pages (not included)

1-inch margins

Double spaced

12-point Times New Roman font

Title page

Structure a policy argument or claim that is definitive, de

Structure a policy argument or claim that is definitive, designative, evaluative, and advocative, using one of these terms: (a) crime, (b) pollution, (c) terrorism, (d) quality of life, (e) global warming, (f) fiscal crisis, (g) human rights, and (h) unemployment.
Convert the argument in the first discussion into a policy debate by providing an objection and a rebuttal.
Explain if and why the qualifier changed after introducing an objection and rebuttal. If the qualifier did not change, explain why it did not change.
Discuss at least two benefits to structuring arguments before and while developing written documents.

Instructions For this assignment, you will compose a wel

Instructions

For this assignment, you will compose a well-written and thoughtful short-essay of 500-750 words in length (2-3 pages). Select and answer one of the four questions provided.

Format & Expectations

State your thesis, the answer you want to defend using at least three well-supported reasons embodying logic, reason, and research. Give possible objections to your arguments, answer these objections and restate your conclusion. Essays should include a Works Cited page following MLA Style. For grading expectations, please see the iRubric for this assignment in the Gradebook.

Submission

Submit your essay as an attachment within the Assignments area.

Due: Sunday, by 11:55 p.m., ET

Questions:

Answer one of the questions below in a well-written, thoughtful essay:

Do all arguments about abortion come down to the question of what is the moral status of the fetus? Explain.
Agree or disagree with the statement, “the only proper context for sex given its nature is as part of a committed personal relation”.
Agree or disagree with the statement, “there is no objective right and wrong because people never agree about what is right and wrong”.
Psychological egoism is the view that all persons, without exception, seek their own self-interest. Argue for or against.
https://edge.apus.edu/access/content/attachment/386903/Assignments/2e7aa5f0-97b7-4fa8-b06b-c750b68ca76d/MLA%20Sample%20Paper.pdf